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Take the whole family to Oaks Park June 8 for the 91st annual Scandinavian Midsummer Festival.

COURTESY PHOTOS  - You can make floral wreaths like these at Midsummer Fest taking place June 8 at Oaks Park in Portland. All are welcome to celebrate the Nordic festival.

Scandinavian roots are not required to celebrate Portland's 91st-annual Scandinavian Midsummer Festival. The Midsummer Festival takes place from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, June 8 at Oaks Park, 7805 SE Oaks Park Way, Portland. Admission is $8 for adults, $7 for students and seniors, or $17 for families of two adults and two children. Children 11 and under are admitted free of charge.

It continues to be a fun, family-friendly and important day with centuries-old traditions and everyone is invited.

Two stages will keep the entertainment coming, from traditional dancing and physical comedy to vibrant live music.

Taste classic foods such as Swedish pancakes, sweet cardamom rolls, cinnamon sugar lefse and Danish aebelskiver, or enjoy savory foods from Viking Soul Food or Scandinavian Cafe, Carina's Bakery, Sweet Kardamom, Finlandia Foundation or the league: lefse, laks, polser and more.

Explore Nordic vendor booths from throughout the Pacific Northwest and shop for everything from traditional swords and weaponry and Nordic vintage finds to locally made artisan crafts and Nordic outdoor gear.

Children will enjoy making flower necklaces or Nordic walking sticks with wood from Fogelbo Forest and face painting (noon to 2 p.m. and 3 to 4 p.m.). They can also take part in a scavenger hunt and win fun prizes.

It's a Nordic belief that the fresh summer greenery contains magic. The weaving of a floral Midsummer wreath has been a way of harnessing this magic and ensure good health throughout the year in traditional Midsummer celebrations for centuries.

To learn more visit nordicnorthwest.org.

And don't miss the raising of the Maypole at 2 p.m. The majstang is decorated from top to bottom in flowers and bird and once standing, signals the beginning of the summer season.


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