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City Councilor becomes first candidate to emerge in 2020 Lake Oswego mayoral race

City Councilor Theresa Kohlhoff announced Thursday that she is running for Mayor of Lake Oswego in 2020.

Kohlhoff published a video announcing her candidacy to her Youtube account Thursday afternoon that talks about the things that make Lake Oswego great, and how Lake Oswego can rise to the challenge to solve problems both here in the community as well as the region. FILE PHOTO - THERESA KOHLHOFF

"We are not now regional leaders, and there's no reason for this other than a myopic view that we might not be here in 20 years, so let's just do what's best for us now," the video states. "It's the 'Things look pretty good outside my window' sort of attitude, instead of us acting boldly and unselfishly, not only to benefit ourselves, but our kids and their kids."

Kohlhoff, a resident of Lake Oswego since 1989, was elected to City Council in 2016 and has been a voice for affordable housing, the environment and inclusion.

She has a B.A. in English from Portland State University and a J.D. from Lewis & Clark Law School. She has been a practicing attorney since 1980.

Before being elected to the council, she was on the Board of Governors for the Oregon State Bar for four years, the last year being chair of budget and finance.

By announcing her candidacy early, Kohlhoff hopes to gather as many community voices as possible to bring new perspective.

"There is a lot of activity in the world right now; this is not the most important race in the national scene, but it's important to Lake Oswego," Kohlhoff told The Review. "Slowly we're rolling (my campaign) out and letting people know so I have the opportunity to hear from everyone and, visa versa, I can talk to everyone because attention will be so diffuse."

Some of the issues that are important to Kohlhoff ahead of 2020 include improving Lake Oswego public transportation infrastructure and access, affordable housing, homelessness and climate change.

She believes that her boomer generation has a lot more in common with young voters than many would be led to believe, and hopes to capitalize on this in her bid for mayor.

"I do believe that Lake Oswego is paying attention and is a lot more concerned about maintaining our community," Kohlhoff said. "If we can talk to each other and not bark, as best we can, I do think people are on the same page."


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